Grand Canyon as Painting Instructor

July 26, 2010
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Grand Canyon as Painting Instructor

TIME FLIES WHEN YOU’RE HAVING A GOOD TIME! The last twenty years have landed me here in 2010, and 1990 seems just a few moments ago — not two decades behind me. Most peo­ple do not know that the late 80s, early 90s were a tran­si­tion period for me artis­ti­cally. I migrated from cre­at­ing very tight rep­re­sen­ta­tional paint­ings to a more loose, Impres­sion­is­tic (bor­der­ing on Expres­sion­is­tic) style. Nine­teen ninety marked the year my hus­band and I bought a bea­gle pup, Miss Mag­gie, who would sleep beneath my easel as I painted Canyon Song. This was a 2 x 6 foot depic­tion of the Grand Canyon’s South Rim with a bend in the river was one of my ‘teachers’. What I Loved I so much “got into” this paint­ing that I hated to stop. The changes in light peer­ing down into the canyon cap­ti­vated me. One of the Seven Won­ders of the...
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Publishing a Book About You & Your Artwork

July 22, 2010
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EVERYONE SEEKS THEIR FIFTEEN MINUTES of fame. One way to achieve this goal is to have their body of art work bound in a beau­ti­ful book. Here are just a few of a mul­ti­tude of considerations. Pub­lisher or Self-Published Decide whether you want your work pub­lished in a book by a pub­lisher or if you wish to self-publish. Both are viable, how­ever, with the incep­tion of lulu.com and other order as-you-go com­pa­nies many artists today are going the self-publishing route. Emerg­ing or Known If you are a “known” artist, you are more likely to be picked-up by a pub­lisher that you approach with a pro­posal. If you go this route, research which pub­lish­ers print books about indi­vid­ual liv­ing artists, how to put a pro­fes­sional pack­age together to send to a pub­lisher, then submit. Impor­tant: only sub­mit to one pub­lisher at a time. If they decline your sub­mit­tal, send to the...
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Weathering and Winning in an Art Market Slump

July 17, 2010
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Weathering and Winning in an Art Market Slump

IF YOU ARE A PROFESSIONAL ARTIST AT ANY SKILL LEVEL, you have prob­a­bly have felt a more sig­nif­i­cant down­turn in sales now more than in recent years: years that have been lean at best. Most sig­nif­i­cantly, fluc­tu­at­ing gas/housing prices and more pro­foundly, the eco­nomic issues fac­ing our coun­try on Capi­tol Hill. At this writ­ing the price of most every­thing includ­ing art are drop­ping incre­men­tally. The eco­nomic out­look by workers/investors is still shaky and impact­ing all of our lives. I still remem­ber the 1980s boom in sales. Every­one was sell­ing their art: from the high­est to low­est prices. We were all win­ners. Emerg­ing artists were cat­a­pulted to star sta­tus in some quar­ters, and estab­lished artists’ careers flour­ished dar­ing to test higher prices in the mar­ket­place. Oh what a time that was! Remem­ber­ing the “hay days.” When the 1990s hit, so did what I call the “wall of art sales stag­na­tion” (not includ­ing mas­ter­works...
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Survey: Artist, What’s Your “One Thing?”

July 16, 2010
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Survey: Artist, What’s Your “One Thing?”

REMEMBER THE MOVIE, City Slick­ers? Billy Crys­tal played Mitch, a man who was deal­ing with a mid-life cri­sis who went on a trip with his bud­dies to “find him­self” again. Or, as his wife had put it, “Go find your smile again.” Jack Palance, played Curly, the authen­tic sea­soned trail boss who lived an uncom­pli­cated life – a real cow­boy. As Crys­tal and friends took their adven­ture to move a herd of cat­tle,  Mitch was rid­ing along side Curly as they dis­cussed life: Curly: You know what the secret of life is? Mitch: No. What? Curly: This. Mitch: Your fin­ger? Curly: One thing. Just one thing. You stick to that and every­thing else don’t mean Mitch: That’s great, but what’s the “one thing?” Curly: That’s what you gotta fig­ure out. Through­out the rest of the movie, Mitch sought after that one thing. By the end of...
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Overcoming My Painting Stumbling Blocks

July 14, 2010
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Overcoming My Painting Stumbling Blocks

EVERYONE AT ONE TIME OR ANOTHER faces try­ing times; finan­cial, fam­ily, oblig­a­tions, com­mit­ments, sud­den tragedies and more. But some­times there are strug­gles I’ve expe­ri­enced as an artist over the years, and a few seem to boomerang over and over. What are some I have faced? I’ll tell you about a few then talk about how they applied to the paint­ing posted here. I For­got My Tube of X Every time I have com­pany over for din­ner, I for­get some­thing. It is usu­ally the plates (yes the plates;) but­ter dish, spoons or bread. But it never fails. With all the plan­ning I do ahead of time, I have to excuse myself from the table to get this or that. This hap­pens when I paint out­doors as well. I spend hours replen­ish­ing my paint­ing bag upon return­ing from one trip so I am ready for the next. If dri­ving, I take a...
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Di's Tips
Paintings Too Tight?

Try using your other hand to paint with. Voila!